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2009/10 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

THEO5265M Race and Religion in Southern Africa: Apartheid and its Aftermath

30 creditsClass Size: 50

Module manager: Dr Kevin Ward
Email: trskw@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2009/10

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module examines interconnections between religion and race in Southern Africa from 1948 to the present. It explores the religious sources of racial and cultural distinctiveness, especially between black and white, and the political, social and theological theories that gave rise to Apartheid (separate development). Attention is paid to Christian, Muslim, Jewish and Hindu contributions to the struggle to end discrimination, and to the place of the indigenous religious traditions. The importance of the National Party, the African National Congress, the Pan-Africanist Congress and Black Consciousness is explored. The course examines the post-Apartheid situation in southern Africa, focusing on such themes as the 'African Renaissance' and the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:
- have gained an understanding of the complex relationship between race and religion in Southern Africa.
- evaluate the historical, political and religious roots of Apartheid (the political philosophy of 'separate development' on racial grounds).
- appreciate the different motivations and strategies of the participants in the struggle to enforce Apartheid or to oppose it.
- understand the religious dimension of the National Party, the African National Congress, the Pan-Africanist Congress and other political parties and campaigning groups within Southern Africa.
- assess the role of Christian churches, the Muslim, Hindu and Jewish communities in the struggle.
- show the interaction between religious values and secular philosophies such as racial supremacy, liberal democracy and Communism.
- have knowledge of, and the ability to assess, important political and religious statements concerning race relations in Southern Africa, and an appreciation of a range of writings (novels, poetry, sermons, prison diaries, memoirs, funeral orations).
- critically to explore the theological and religious implications for public life of the struggle against Apartheid and the establishment of a non-racial civil society in contemporary Southern Africa.
- assess the wider significance of Southern African issues of race and religion in a global context.

Syllabus

The module examines the interconnections between religion and race in Southern Africa from 1948 to the present. It critically explores the religious sources of racial and cultural distinctiveness, especially between black and white, and the political, social and theological theories which gave rise to Apartheid (separate development). Attention is paid to Christian, Muslim, Jewish and Hindu contributions in the struggle to end discrimination, and to the place of the indigenous religious traditions. The importance of movements such as the National Party, the African National Congress, the Pan-Africanist Congress and Black Consciousness is explored. The course examines the post-Apartheid situation in southern Africa, focusing on such themes as the 'African Renaissance' and the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

There is an engagement with the theological themes of humanity (ubuntu), covenant, sin, salvation and security, liberation, judgement, reconciliation, and forgiveness. The course encourages a creative appropriation of these themes for wider issues of race and religion in the contemporary world.

There will be a detailed examination of documents and texts arising from religious engagement in the Apartheid struggle.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Seminar62.0012.00
Private study hours277.00
Total Contact hours23.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

4 hours reading per lecture = 44 hours
8 hours reading per seminar = 48 hours
Preparation for assignment = 185 hours

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

There will be an opportunity for individual discussion about the theme of the assessed essay, and discussion at various points in the process of writing, with an opportunity for feedback on a draft of the final writing.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Assignment6,000 words100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 14/07/2010

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