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2016/17 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

CAPE5901M Reverse Engineering

30 creditsClass Size: 25

Module manager: Dr T Hunter
Email: t.n.hunter@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2016/17

Pre-requisite qualifications

BEng/MEng, BSc/MChem in relevant engineering or science discipline

Module replaces

CAPE5910M Chemical Product Design Project

This module is not approved as an Elective

Module summary

Formulated products in agrochemicals, catalysts, coatings, fine chemicals, foods, healthcare, home and personal care, and pharmaceuticals industries are Complex Particulate Products are worth 25B£ to the UK economy. These highly-structured multi-phase products contain particulates, often modified by the adsorption of additives to increase product stability and enhance the efficacy and delivery of 'active' ingredients.This module teaches students to work out how products work and what is involved in the design of them. Students will 'reverse engineer a common household product (e.g. toothpaste). The key questions are simple: How does the product work? What are the key features sought in the product? How do the detailed physical and chemical features deliver these product benefits to the end-user? Working with an academic mentor, the students analyse (which may require experimental work) the product and the links between its physical and chemical features and the consumer needs and present their learning in a 5-10 min video presentation. In the second phase of this module, the student groups will be given a new product brief (supplied by one of our industry partners) and will undertake the design phase of product development working through: (i) Plan; (ii) define consumer needs; (iii) specify product features; (iv) brainstorm concepts; (v) select favoured concept; (vi) justify choice; (vii) risk assess; and, (viii) report. The main output of this component will be a product pitch.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should:
Specific objectives:
- an introduction to product and process development;
- be able to analyse products, identify its key components and their function in order to understand how the product works;
- understand the various stages of product design.

Transferable skills objectives:
- have used and understand a range of communication techniques;
- have applied techniques for creative thinking especially within an industrial context.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this module, participants should be able to:
Specific outcomes:
- understand generic skills of new chemical product design;
- define consumer needs;
- specify product features;
- brainstorm concepts;
- select options and provide the selection rationale;
- risk assess.

Transferable skills:
- have an understanding of a range of communication channels, e.g. audio/visual communications, documents, presentations;
- persuasive skills;
- identify which techniques for creative thinking to use.

Skills outcomes
As part of the module the students will have the opportunity to learn a number of transferable skills which are key to the delivery of good outcomes.

These include:
- Critical evaluation of the literature, including literature search and retrieval;
- Methodologies associated with design and analysis during projects;
- Option selection strategies;
- Reasoning and problem solving;
- Skills in communication and targeting the audience;
- Professional skills and attitudes;
- Teamwork;
- Keep an accurate, formal record of meetings and research performed.


Syllabus

Reverse engineering:
Students will be required to 'reverse engineer' a common household product that includes one or more particulate materials in its formulation (e.g. toothpaste). The key questions are simple: How does the product work? What are the key features sought in the product? How do the detailed physical and chemical features deliver these product benefits to the end-user?
Working with an academic mentor, the students prepare a short (10 page) report describing the product and the links between its physical and chemical features and the consumer needs. It is likely that the students will need to design and execute a series of laboratory tests to understand key aspects of their product, for example rheological analysis of toothpaste. They will also receive targeted technical knowledge training through attendance at selected lectures, industrial led workshops and courses and seminars.

Product design:
Students, in groups, will be given a new product brief (supplied by an industry partners) and will undertake the design phase of product development. The student groups will need to work through the various stages of this process: (i) Plan; (ii) define consumer needs; (iii) specify product features; (iv) brainstorm concepts; (v) select favoured concept; (vi) justify choice; (vii) risk assess; and, (viii) report. The main output of this component will be a product pitch intended to be given to a panel of industrial experts.

We will provide a short course on 'Creativity Skills'. This is modelled on an IChemE course by Dr Jamie Cleaver, an expert in creative thinking for engineers (www.jamiecleaver.co.uk), who will supply a bespoke course for our students.

We will also provide a series of workshops covering the key aspects of product design; problem definition, brainstorming and selection. Utilizing lectures from industry partners (where possible) to maximize exposure to industrial practice.

Transferable skills: communication and independence:
Working with an academic mentor, operating as the project manager, small teams of CDT students (2 or 3) will be required to communicate their work via a range of channels: video, product briefs, culminating in the product pitch. They will decide what information is needed, where they will access this (lectures/seminars/web/books/journals) and what empirical testing is needed to test or prove their hypotheses/answers, and how to present the collated information in a convincing manner.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Team Work203.0060.00
Fieldwork120.0020.00
Group learning36.0018.00
Lecture111.0011.00
Lecture113.0033.00
Tutorial82.0016.00
Tutorial101.0010.00
Independent online learning hours20.00
Private study hours112.00
Total Contact hours168.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Working with an academic mentor, operating as the project manager, small teams of CDT students (2-4) will report weekly to discuss what information is needed, where they will access this (lectures/seminars/web/books/journals) and what empirical testing is needed to test or prove their hypotheses/answers. These meetings will be minuted by the students. The VLE diary provides a monitoring tool across the programme and will be discussed at quarterly meetings with senior CDT staff.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
EssayEssay based on CAPE5360M lectures10.00
AssignmentProject process description10.00
PresentationNew product pitch15.00
Group ProjectReverse Engineering report30.00
Self/Peer AssessmentTeam Evaluation5.00
Poster Presentation'How it Works' video15.00
Reflective logVLE diary5.00
Tutorial PerformanceTutorial assessment of the student's performance by supervisor10.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

There is no reading list for this module

Last updated: 09/09/2016

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