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2010/11 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

CLAS3410 Classics on Screen: Antiquity through a Modern Lens

20 creditsClass Size: 70

Module manager: Dr. Emma Stafford
Email: e.j.stafford@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2010/11

This module is mutually exclusive with

CLAS1550Gladiators and Barbarian Queens: Reconfiguring the Ancient W

Module replaces

CLAS1630 Ancient Myth, Modern Media: The Classical World on Film

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module is suitable for all students, regardless of whether they have any prior knowledge of the ancient classical world. The aim of this module is two-fold: to provide students with an insight into the historical/ mythical background behind a range of popular figures/ stories from the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, and to allow them to appreciate the complex ways in which these figures/ stories have been represented, manipulated and distorted over the past two millennia, with particular emphasis on twentieth-/ twenty-first-century film. Topics for study in any given year may include: the figures of Herakles, Spartacus and Cleopatra, and the stories of the Trojan War and the three-hundred Spartans at Thermopylae. Lectures will provide an introduction to the topics and their development through time, and seminars will encourage students to discuss the material in smaller groups, with particular emphasis on how and why myths change through time.

Objectives

On successful completion of this module, students are expected to be able to:
- discuss, both orally and in writing, the development of stories from the ancient Greek and Roman worlds and their treatment in modern film/ TV;
- discuss the distinction between ancient myth and ancient history, and the blurring of boundaries between the two;
- identify, where appropriate, the various contemporary external factors being brought to bear on the particular representation, and explain how and why the story has been adapted;
- demonstrate a range of subject-specific skills, including an ability to analyse critically various forms of media (literature, film and art) and relate them to each other where appropriate;
- demonstrate a range of transferable skills, including verbal and written expression, the organisation of personal study, group work and advanced use of IT resources.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students are expected to know the historical/ mythical background to a range of popular figures/ stories from the ancient Greek and Roman worlds. They are expected to be able to trace the development of these stories and, where appropriate, explain the various contexts for their creative adaptation through time.

Skills outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students are expected to be able to:
- demonstrate a range of subject-specific skills, including an ability to analyse critically various forms of media (literature, film and art) and relate them to each other where appropriate;
- demonstrate a range of transferable skills, including verbal and written expression, the organisation of personal study, group work and advanced use of IT resources.


Syllabus

The aim of this module is two-fold: to provide students with an insight into the historical/ mythical background behind a range of popular figures/ stories from the ancient Greek and Roman worlds, and to allow them to appreciate the complex ways in which these figures/ stories have been represented, manipulated and distorted over the past two millennia, with particular emphasis on twentieth-/ twenty-first-century film. Topics for study in any given year may include: the figures of Herakles, Spartacus and Cleopatra, and the stories of the Trojan War and the three-hundred Spartans at Thermopylae. Lectures will provide an introduction to the topics and their development through time, and seminars will encourage students to discuss the material in smaller groups, with particular emphasis on how and why myths change through time.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture121.0012.00
Seminar81.008.00
Private study hours180.00
Total Contact hours20.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

1 hour reading preparation per lecture (= 12 hours)
26 hours film viewing (each film twice = c. 26 hours)
4 hours reading preparation per seminar (= 32 hours)
40 hours group poster presentation (40% of module mark)
70 hours on the two-hour exam (60% of module mark)

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

One assessed piece of group work (poster presentation) and seminar participation.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Poster Presentation2,000-3,000 words40.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)40.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)2 hr 60.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)60.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 27/04/2011

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