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2017/18 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

MUSS5430M Editing and Archival Studies

30 creditsClass Size: 10

Module manager: Dr Bryan White
Email: b.white@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2017/18

Pre-requisite qualifications

First degree in an arts subject; demonstrable knowledge of music and musical terminology; you are advised to consult the module leader if you wish to consider this as an optional module.

This module is not approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module provides a thorough grounding in the principles of transcribing and editing from original sources of music and text, both printed and manuscript, and the skills, methods and approaches required when investigating the archival materials that inform musicological study. Problems of reading, understanding, and interpreting source materials are discussed throughout (drawing on the disciplines of palaeography, codicology, transcription and editing), and guidance is given on how to locate collections appropriate to student's research interests. Specific research tasks and at least one field trip will enable students to get to know local archives, their organisation, strengths, limitations, and music-related holdings, and to work effectively in that setting.Teaching takes place in seminar groups, with tutorial support. Assessment is by a portfolio (60%) of either a critical edition with critical commentary (4000 words or equivalent), or a comprehension exercise from archival documents (4000 words) and an assignment (40%): of a transcription and a critical edition with 1000-word commentaries.Pre-requisite for those students who wish to choose as an optional module:First degree in an arts subject; demonstrable knowledge of music and musical terminology; you are advised to consult the module leader if you wish to consider this as an optional module.

Objectives

This module will explore the principles of transcribing and editing musical and textual sources, and of finding, using and interpreting archival materials.

The primary issues to be explored include:

Theoretical principles of editorial work.
Practical principles of transcribing and presenting musical scores and written texts
Understanding the purpose, construction and provenance of manuscript and printed material
Consideration of philological and historiographical issues, regarding the relation of written records to musical and cultural history
Analysis and interpretation of musical and textual handwriting
Development of skills and tools of source location and procedures for working in different types of musical and documentary archives.

Learning outcomes
- Devise and write a critical commentary on a musical and/or documentary source, including bibliographical or codicological description as appropriate
- Produce a critically edited text from at least one manuscript or printed original sources, demonstrating the ability to select and work consistently within appropriate editorial guidelines
- Identify and negotiate problems in reading and interpreting original manuscript or printed materials, including corrupt, incomplete, or otherwise difficult sources
- Research issues of historical context and performance practice, as defined by the source(s) under consideration


Syllabus

This module provides a thorough grounding in the principles of transcribing and editing from original sources, both printed and manuscript, and the skills, methods and approaches required when investigating the archival materials that inform musicological study. Problems of reading, understanding, and interpreting source materials are discussed throughout (drawing on the disciplines of palaeography, codicology, transcription and editing), and guidance is given on how to locate collections appropriate to student's research interests. Specific research tasks and at least one field trip will enable students to get to know local archives, their organisation, strengths, limitations, and music-related holdings, and to work effectively in that setting. In the latter stages of the module, the relationships between data, facts, and interpretation are explored, focusing on ways in which archival sources can be used in the study of music and writing of musical history.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Visit12.002.00
Seminar102.0020.00
Tutorial11.001.00
Private study hours277.00
Total Contact hours23.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

Follow-up and preparation tasks: eight hours per lecture (80 hrs)
Preparation of short editions (40 hrs each)
Preparation of final project (117 hours)

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Prescribed reading and research tasks (as preparation for and/or follow-up to seminars), reported orally in class; practice transcription of an archival document; practice edition from a musical source; both short editions are returned with feedback before students submit final project.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Assignmentshort edition: documentary - transcription of archival document(s), with critical20.00
Assignmentshort edition: music - critical edition from one or more musical sources, with critical20.00
Assignmentprescribed reading and research tasks - these tasks are a PASS/FAIL element0.00
Projecteither a critical edition with critical commentary (3600-4400 words or equivalent), or a comprehension exercise from archival documents (3600 to 4400 words)60.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

The prescribed reading and research tasks are a PASS/FAIL element.

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 21/09/2016

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