Module and Programme Catalogue

Search site

Find information on

2017/18 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

MUSS5633M Electronic & Computer Music Contexts

30 creditsClass Size: 30

Module manager: Dr James Mooney
Email: j.r.mooney@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2017/18

Pre-requisite qualifications

Beneficial:
- Grounding in theory relevant to electronic and computer music and music technology at undergraduate level.
Essential:
- Willingness to learn (independently) the relevant theory to the extent required for a contextual study of electronic and computer music.

Module replaces

MUSS5635M Computer Music Contexts

This module is not approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module will provide students with a critical historical overview of the individuals, institutions, innovations and repertoire that helped to shape electronic music and computer music. It will give them a representative overview of current practice in electronic and computer music, referring to individuals, institutions, innovations and repertoire that represent the current state of the art. The module will allow students to engage critically and analytically with electronic music and computer music, past and present, through reference to relevant critical, analytic, aesthetic, theoretical, and/or philosophical frameworks.Students attend weekly seminars in which set texts and works of electronic or computer music are discussed. The range of texts and works aims to provide a balanced overview of historical and contemporary, practice-based and theoretical, critical and analytical work in or relevant to the fields of electronic music and computer music.Assessment includes a verbal presentation (20%) including facilitation of discussion and follow-up report (1000-1500 words), and an essay (80%) of approximately 4500-5500 words.

Objectives

1) Provide students with a critical historical overview of the individuals, institutions, innovations and repertoire that helped to shape electronic and computer music;
2) Provide students with a representative overview of current practice in electronic and computer music, referring to individuals, institutions, innovations and repertoire that represent the current state of the art;
3) Allow students to engage critically and analytically with electronic and computer music, past and present, through reference to relevant critical, analytic, aesthetic, theoretical, and/or philosophical frameworks.

Learning outcomes
On completing the module students will:
1) demonstrate knowledge of a range of historical developments that helped to shape the development of electronic and computer music;
2) demonstrate their familiarity with the work of a range of practitioners, current and historic, that are relevant to the field of electronic and computer music, and have an awareness of the contexts within which their work is situated;
3) demonstrate their ability to ‘read’ current and historic practice in electronic and computer music critically and analytically, through the application of one or more critical, analytic, aesthetic, theoretical, and/or philosophical frameworks.


Syllabus

Students attend weekly seminars in which set texts and works of electronic and computer music are discussed. The range of texts and works aims to provide a balanced overview of historical and contemporary, practice-based and theoretical, critical and analytical work in or relevant to the fields of electronic and computer music.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar102.0020.00
Private study hours280.00
Total Contact hours20.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

• 84 hours: Reading of / listening to weekly prescribed texts / works
• 84 hours: Digesting, annotating, re-reading, re-listening, discussing (with peers), summarising and note-taking on weekly prescribed texts / works, including work on the précis
• 112 hours: Researching, drafting, writing, and additional reading and listening for Essay

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Student progress is monitored on a weekly basis by individual tutors. Student contribution to class sessions forms part of the assessment for this module and is reviewed weekly by the module coordinator.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Presentationincluding facilitation of discussion and follow-up précis (1000-1500 words)20.00
Essay4500-5500 words80.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 09/05/2016

Disclaimer

Browse Other Catalogues

Errors, omissions, failed links etc should be notified to the Catalogue Team.PROD

© Copyright Leeds 2019