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2017/18 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

THEO5050M Religions and Global Development

30 creditsClass Size: 30

Module manager: Dr Emma Tomalin
Email: e.tomalin@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2017/18

Module replaces

THEO5360M Religion, Theology and Development Issues

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

What is the relationship between religions and international development? Do religions promote or hinder development? How do religious models of development relate to the secular economics based framework that has dominated international development in the post-world war II period? This module will offer opportunities to study the operation of religion in relation to development theory and action; the nature of religion as resource, obstacle and critical participant in development; particular forms of co-operation between religious communities, religious aid agencies and communities in development; and the relationship of religion, human values and community building. The module will critically reflect upon why religions were ignored/marginalised in development discourse until recently, in the context of broader understandings of the 'resurgence' of religion in public life and the reconfiguration of the secularism debate. The syllabus will include discussion of the views that religious traditions hold about areas key to development debates, including: poverty and debt; welfare and philanthropy; economic; human rights; environmentalism; reproductive rights and gender. Throughout, we will integrate thinking about the policy relevance to different sorts of organizations of research that looks at the relationship between religions and international development.If the module recruits three or fewer students, it will be delivered via 3 hours of supervision with the module leader (instead of the format specified below).

Objectives

- To examine the complex relationships between religions and global development;
- To understand why religions were ignored/marginalised in development discourse until recently, in the context of broader understandings of the 'resurgence' of religion in public life and the reconfiguration of the secularism debate;
- To look at attitudes within the world religions towards key areas, including: poverty and debt; welfare and philanthropy; economics; human rights; environmentalism; reproductive rights and gender;
- To critically evaluate the relevance of religion to development, in particular the nature of religion as resource, obstacle and critical participant in development;
- To study examples of the operation of 'faith-based organizations' working in development (e.g. humanitarian relief, service delivery, advocacy);
- To think about the policy relevance to different sorts of organizations of research that looks at the relationship between religions and international development.

Learning outcomes
- Key theories about secularisation and modernisation and how these relate to the relationship between religions and development;
- Introduction to development concepts and processes;
- Knowledge about the way that religious traditions view key areas within development discourse including: poverty and debt; welfare and philanthropy; economics; human rights; environmentalism; reproductive rights and gender
- An understanding of the nature, scale and scope of the faith-based sector in development.

Skills outcomes
Independent research and writing skills; presentation skills; ability to organise time; critical thinking skills (e.g. challenging the appropriate of taken for granted distinctions such as 'secular' and 'religious' as uniform and universally applicable); ability to apply critical theories to practical contexts (e.g. gender theory); to begin to think about ways in which academic research can be translated into policy (impact and knowledge transfer).


Syllabus

The study of religion in society: modernization, secularization and the resurgence of religion; development as a religious concern; the mainstreaming of religion in development; the approaches of different academic disciplines to the intersection of religion and development; religious values and beliefs about development; development theory and practice in major world religions; the nature, scale and scope of the faith-based organization sector; secular versus faith-based approaches to development; religious attitudes to environmental issues in theory and in practice; gender, religion and development.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Seminar102.0020.00
Private study hours269.00
Total Contact hours31.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

6 hours a week preparing for each seminar (6x10) = 60 hours
5 hours preparation for presentation
5 hours doing background reading following on from each lecture (5x11) = 55 hours

Essay preparation and writing = 149 hours

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

1. Informal monitoring in the weekly seminars, in terms of student preparation and engagement with the discussion; student presentations;
2. Formal: written work (1 x 6,000 word essay).

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay6,000 words100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

The resit will consist of one 6,000 word essay.

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 05/08/2016

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