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2018/19 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ENGL32997 Keywords: The Words We Use and The Ways We Use Them

20 creditsClass Size: 30

For full module descriptions of our level 2 and 3 undergraduate modules (including details of preparatory reading, texts for purchase and required unassessed work) please see the Undergraduate Module Handbook in the English Organisation on the VLE.

Visiting and Exchange Students must read this information before selecting modules.

Module manager: Professor Tony Crowley
Email: t.crowley@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2018/19

Pre-requisite qualifications

Students wishing to take this module must have passed an introduction to language study in the School of English or another department (such modules include 'English Structure and Style', 'Analysing English', 'English: Context, Culture & Style', a Level 1 module in Linguistics and Phonetics, or similar modules in other departments in Modern Languages.) If you do not meet this requirement, but do have a Grade A in English Language A-level, and you wish to take this module, you must consult the module tutor, as should any student who is uncertain whether they meet the pre-requisite requirements.

Module replaces

ENGL32142

This module is approved as a discovery module

Module summary

This module will introduce students to the study of the way in which 'keywords' (central terms we use to describe, categorize and evaluate our social and natural worlds words) originated, developed historically, and are used today. Examples might include terms such as 'scientist'; 'cool'; 'teenager'; 'individual'; 'student'; 'culture; 'dickhead'; 'society'; 'sket'; 'welfare', 'on fleek'. The course will include a consideration of the changing ways in which words have been defined (through a study of dictionaries from the Renaissance to the present from Cawdrey's Table Alphabetical 1604 to urbandictionary.com). And it will allow students to understand the complexity of everyday terms that are often taken to be simple and straightforward. The course will encourage critical reflexivity with regard to language use and provide an opportunity for independent research in this area.

Objectives

This module will introduce students to the study of the way in which 'keywords' (central terms we use to describe, categorize and evaluate our social and natural worlds words) originated, developed historically, and are used today. Examples might include terms such as 'scientist'; 'cool'; 'teenager'; 'individual'; 'student'; 'culture'; 'dickhead'; 'society'; 'sket'; 'welfare'. The course will include a consideration of the changing ways in which words have been defined (through a study of dictionaries from the Renaissance to the present - from Cawdrey's Table Alphabetical 1604 to urbandictionary.com). And it will allow students to understand the complexity of everyday terms that are often taken to be simple and straightforward. The course will encourage critical reflexivity with regard to language use and provide an opportunity for independent research in this area.

Learning outcomes
Students will develop:
- the ability to write clearly and to engage in disscussion in an articulate manner
- the capacity to think analytically and critically
- the ability to make a reasoned argument
- the capacity to form independent judgement
- research skills, including the retrieval, organisation, and evaluation of materials
- efficient time management skills


Syllabus

This module will introduce students to the study of the way in which 'keywords' (central terms we use to describe, categorize and evaluate our social and natural worlds words) originated, developed historically, and are used today. Examples might include terms such as 'scientist'; 'cool'; 'teenager'; 'individual'; 'student'; 'culture; 'dickhead'; 'society'; 'sket'; 'welfare', 'on fleek'. The course will include a consideration of the changing ways in which words have been defined (through a study of dictionaries from the Renaissance to the present from Cawdrey's Table Alphabetical 1604 to urbandictionary.com). And it will allow students to understand the complexity of everyday terms that are often taken to be simple and straightforward. The course will encourage critical reflexivity with regard to language use and provide an opportunity for independent research in this area.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Meetings51.005.00
Seminar101.0010.00
Private study hours185.00
Total Contact hours15.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Teaching will be through weekly seminars (10 x 1 hour) plus up to 5 additional hours for the return of assessed essays.

Private Study: Reading, seminar preparation, essay writing.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

- Contribution to seminars
- Feedback from assessed work

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
AssignmentAn account of a keyword (500 words) and an essay on the methodological difficulties encountered in constructing the account (1500 words)40.00
PortfolioFive individual accounts of 'keywords' (500 words each)60.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 02/04/2019

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