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2019/20 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

CLAS2800 Evidence and Enquiry in Classics

20 creditsClass Size: 100

Module manager: Dr Sam Gartland
Email: s.d.gartland@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semesters 1 & 2 View Timetable

Year running 2019/20

This module is not approved as a discovery module

Module summary

This module is designed to build on and enhance the skills which you have developed at level 1, and to prepare you to pursue independent research at level 3 with the help and guidance of an academic supervisor. It offers a survey of Classics today, of classes of evidence, and of the various areas of classical research. The module encourages a holistic view of Classics as a discipline, which is essential for conducting effective research. It also incorporates practical sessions on research skills such as compiling bibliographies (including electronic resources), academic writing and structuring written work.The module is largely intended to set you up for the work you will do for the level 3 independent research module, CLAS3200 Major Research Project, and therefore to help you to develop as researchers. The Major Research Project (a.k.a. ‘Final Year Project’ or ‘undergraduate dissertation’) involves extensive independent study, on a Classical topic of your own choosing, and the eventual presentation of your research in the form of a clearly structured piece of writing, pursuing an argument of your own design. The final session of CLAS2800 relates directly to the work you will do for this.

Objectives

On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: display an enhanced knowledge of the scope of Classics as a discipline and of the various practical sub-disciplines which it embraces (e.g. numismatics, textual criticism) and the techniques of investigation appropriate to each, and an awareness of the information resources available to students of antiquity; give an account of a range of critical approaches to the sub-disciplines of Classics, choose appropriately from among them and apply them effectively; and demonstrate research skills developed and enhanced to give them the capacity to pursue independent research at Level 3.

Learning outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. demonstrate knowledge of a range of subject-specific skills relating to the range of types of evidence available for the study of the ancient world;
2. identify, locate, analyse critically and combine as appropriate the evidence relating to particular aspects of antiquity;
3. demonstrate practical use of a range of transferable skills, particularly those required to pursue independent research, including written expression and information literacy
4. evidence good time management by planning for in advance and subsequently completing four short exercises across the length of the module
5. demonstrate flexibility by producing written work in a variety of formats different from a standard essay, adapting their writing style to suit different contexts and requirements.
6. develop and use a range of advanced search techniques, including keyword searching on subject-specific databases.

Skills outcomes
On successful completion of this module, students are expected to be able to:
- demonstrate a range of subject-specific skills relating to the range of types of evidence available for the study of the ancient world, including the ability to identify, locate, analyse critically and combine as appropriate the evidence relating to particular aspects of antiquity;
- demonstrate a range of transferable skills, particularly those required to pursue independent research, including written expression and information literacy.


Syllabus

The module will begin with a survey of Classics as a discipline today, followed by a series of classes designed to enhance research and writing skills, including a practical library session, on research methods such as compiling bibliographies (including electronic resources), academic writing and engaging critically with academic scholarship. The module will then move into a survey of classes of evidence, beginning with textual sources. This will include an introduction to ancient literary criticism and an overview of modern critical theory.

The second semester will lead in to considerations of textual transmission and criticism, editing and texts in translation, and will include a practical session on papyri, manuscripts and early printed books. The survey of classes of evidence will then move into material sources and explore Classical art, archaeology and related sub-disciplines, including a session on numismatics (coin studies) and a practical coin-handling session. The module will conclude with an exploration of Classical research in the digital age and a session on approaching independent research projects.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Practicals11.501.50
Practicals20.501.00
Lecture171.0017.00
Private study hours180.50
Total Contact hours19.50
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

The 180.5 private study hours (taking away 19.5 contact hours) comprise of:
4 hours reading per lecture = 4 x 19 = 76 hours
Consultation with dissertation supervisor in week 20 = 0.5 hours
Work on practical assignments = 4 x 26 = 104 hours

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Students will receive formative feedback from the module tutors during class contact hours and especially in practical sessions. They will also receive detailed summative feedback on their four assessed exercises throughout the course of the year, providing them with a formal indicator of their progress on the module. Students will also be encouraged to attend the module teaching team’s drop-in hours to discuss the module content, draft assignments, or to request further clarification of feedback already provided on assessed work. Students will likewise be encouraged to contact tutors (via email, during office hours, or before/after classes) signposted as academic advisors for each of the assessed exercises in order to receive further guidance on coursework and advice on draft work.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Source AnalysisNot more than 1,200 words.25.00
Assignment1200 word Journal Articles review25.00
AssignmentBibliographic exercise of not more than 1,200 words.25.00
Practical1200 word practical exercise25.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 16/09/2019

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