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2018/19 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ENGL32147 Contemporary Postcolonial Texts

20 creditsClass Size: 40

For full module descriptions of our level 2 and 3 undergraduate modules (including details of preparatory reading, texts for purchase and required unassessed work) please see the Undergraduate Module Handbook in the English Organisation on the VLE.

Visiting and Exchange Students must read this information before selecting modules.

Module manager: Dr Brendon Nicholls
Email: B.L.Nicholls@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2018/19

Module replaces

ENGL3309 - Postcolonial Identities

This module is approved as a discovery module

Module summary

In this module, we will explore modes of postcolonial engagement in African, Caribbean and South Asian fiction. Beginning with introductory classes on postcolonial theory, we will investigate the various ways in which postcolonial texts from different regions and periods approach issues of identity-formation, literary form and social critique. The question of identity is central to much postcolonial literature, especially since this literature often operates in contexts of individual and collective transformation. At stake is not simply a redefinition of selfhood, but also a re-imagining of political and cultural community and its relationship to a changing world. Equally, the need for a literary form or an aesthetic adequate to such larger questions is key. Accordingly, we will conside how texts balance literary concerns with wider political and ethical concerns.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students will have an increased knowledge of postcolonial literatures and an enhanced awareness of debates surrounding the issues of postcolonial identitites.

Also, students will have augmented their critical and analytical skills with respect to different kinds of texts, including poetry, and further developed their skills in essay writing.

Learning outcomes
Students will have developed:
- the ability to use written and oral communication effectively;
- the capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse;
- the ability to manage quantities of complex information in a structured and systematic way;
- the capacity for independent thought and judgement;
- critical reasoning;
- research skills, including the retrieval of information, the organisation of material and the evaluation of its importance;
- IT skills;
- efficient time management and organisation skills;
- the ability to learn independently.

Skills outcomes
- Skills for effective communication, oral and written.
- Capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse.
- Ability to acquire quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way.
- Capacity for independent thought and judgement.
- Critical reasoning.
- Research skills, including information retrieval skills, the organisation of material, and the evaluation of its importance.
- IT skills.
- Time management and organisational skills.
- Independent learning.


Syllabus

The question of identity is central to much postcolonial literature, especially since this literature often operates in contexts of individual and collective transformation. At stake is not simply a redefinition of selfhood, but also a re-imagining of political and cultural community and its relationship to a changing world. Equally, the need for a literary form or an aesthetic adequate to such larger questions is key.

In this module, we will explore modes of postcolonial engagement in African, Caribbean and South Asian fiction. Specifically, we will investigate the various ways in which postcolonial texts from different regions and periods approach issues of identity-formation, literary form and social comment.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Meetings51.005.00
Seminar101.0010.00
Private study hours185.00
Total Contact hours15.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Teaching will be through weekly seminars (10 x 1 hour) plus up to 5 additional hours, including plenary lectures and advice on or the return of essays.

Private Study: Reading, seminar preparation and essay writing.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

- Contribution to seminars
- Feedback on 1700 word essay

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1,700 words33.30
Essay2,750 words66.70
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 09/05/2018

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