Module and Programme Catalogue

Search site

Find information on

2019/20 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

ENGL5737M Postcolonialism, Animals and the Environment

30 creditsClass Size: 10

Module manager: Professor Graham Huggan
Email: g.d.m.huggan@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 View Timetable

Year running 2019/20

Pre-requisite qualifications

General requirements for the MA scheme

This module is not approved as an Elective

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able better to understand postcolonial contributions to current debates on environmental and animal welfare issues.

Learning outcomes
By the end of the module students will develop skills in:
1) Effective communication (oral and written).
2) Advanced critical analysis of a range of discourses, genres and texts.
3) Advanced research skills.
4) Time management, independent project management, and organisational skills.
5) Negotiating and debating complex political issues with diplomacy, empathy, and confidence.

Skills outcomes
Masters (Taught), Postgraduate Diploma & Postgraduate Certificate students will have had the opportunity to acquire the following abilities as defined in the modules specified for the programme:
- the skills necessary to undertake a higher research degree and/or for employment in a higher capacity;
- evaluating their own achievement and that of others;
- self direction and effective decision making;
- independent learning and the ability to work in a way which ensures continuing professional development;
- to engage critically in the development of professional/disciplinary boundaries and norms.



Syllabus

Environmental issues have been largely side-lined in postcolonial theory and criticism. This module aims to redress the balance by looking at postcolonial contributions to current debates on such issues as land rights, animal welfare and the ecological fallout of industrial development. The module will also address more immediate concerns of literary representation e.g. whether there are distinct environmental/animal genres, whether these genres carry certain ideological implications, or whether lirerary texts can ever succeed in giving agency to non-human actors or in conveying a non-human voice.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar102.0020.00
Private study hours280.00
Total Contact hours20.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

Reading, researching, preparing seminar presentations

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Student progress will be monitored by a 1,000 unassessed essay and seminar presentations.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1 x 4,000 word essay100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

na

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 30/04/2019

Disclaimer

Browse Other Catalogues

Errors, omissions, failed links etc should be notified to the Catalogue Team.PROD

© Copyright Leeds 2019