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2019/20 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

LAW5830M International Economic Law

15 creditsClass Size: 90

Module manager: Professor Fiona Smith
Email: F.Smith1@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2019/20

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

The objective of the course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of the main framework of international law governing international economic relations between States. The big shifts in economic relations witnessed in the recent past have underlined the significance of the interrelationship between law and economics. It is in this context that this course will consider and evaluate in some detail a select group of topics within international economic law.Accordingly, the course will focus on the interrelationship between law and economics, evolution of the international economic order under the UN; the framework of international economic law derived from international instruments (such as treaties, declarations and resolutions of international organizations); international law of sustainable development; and the law and practice of the World Bank and the IMF.Owing to the multi-disciplinary character of the course there is no single text-book which can be recommended as a course guide or compulsory text for this subject. Students will be referred to a variety of sources, including primary materials such as international treaties and resolutions of the UN General Assembly and other international organizations.

Objectives

By the end of this Section students would have obtained a comprehensive understanding of the fundamental principles of international economic law, their sources, and the manner in which this body of law could be applied to contemporary international economic affairs between States.

Learning outcomes
On completion of this module students should be able to:
- analyse the evolution of international economic order and the present framework of international economic law;
- have a critical understanding of the international efforts to regulate international economic relations between States;
- understand the interplay between law and economics in regulating the international sales transactions;
- critically assess the provisions of various international treaties and other instruments concerning public international economic law;
- develop a critical understanding of the substantive principles of international economic law;
- appreciate the influence of the principle of sustainable development in the development of international economic law;
- understand the institutional framework of international economic law, including the workings of the UN and its specialized agencies;
- analyse critically the workings of the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund;
- apply the knowledge obtained in relation to international economic disputes so as to identify and analyse problems which arise in the law and practice of resolving economic disputes between States as well as between States and private companies.


Syllabus

The objective of the course is to provide a comprehensive and critical understanding of the main framework of international law governing international economic relations between States. This course will consider and evaluate in some detail a select group of topics within international economic law.

Accordingly, the course will focus on the interrelationship between law and economics in the context of international sales transactions, evolution of the international economic order under the UN; the framework of international economic law derived from international instruments (such as treaties, declarations and resolutions of international organisations); international law of sustainable development; and the law and practice of the World Bank and the IMF.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar101.5015.00
Private study hours135.00
Total Contact hours15.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)150.00

Private study

135 hours are allocated to private study. It is expected this will consist of preparation for seminars, reading and reflection following each teaching session and prepartion for assessments.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

By attendance at, and participation in, seminars and class presentations on a topic assigned in advance.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1 x 4,000 word essay100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 20/09/2019

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