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2019/20 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

LUBS5339M International Employment Policy and Labour Mobility

30 creditsClass Size: 90

Module manager: Dr. Jo Ingold
Email: j.ingold@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2019/20

This module is not approved as an Elective

Module summary

Rapid population ageing and the crises of care have given rise to both social and public policy changes in relation to how work is organised, including impacts on labour mobility at a global level. The module will explore how these current challenges have been, and continue to be shaped by firms, governments and supra- and trans-national organisations. It will also examine how these new dynamics and arrangements affect different groups of workers, such as disabled people, women and migrant workers. Students will be encouraged to consider the challenges in their home countries and, through comparative analysis, consider the possibilities for translation of policies between different contexts.

Objectives

This module aims to provide students with knowledge and understanding of the current challenges of rapid population ageing and the crises of care and how these have given rise to both social and public policy changes in relation to how work is organised, including impacts on labour mobility at a global level. It will also explore how these current challenges continue to be shaped by firms, governments and supra- and trans-national organisations and examine how these new dynamics and arrangements affect different groups of workers, such as disabled people, women and migrant workers.

Learning outcomes
Upon completion of this module students will be able to:
- Apply in-depth knowledge and understanding of the current and anticipated public policy challenges relating to the regulation of work and migration at the global, national and sub-national levels to evaluate how these dimensions interact with the crises of care
- Describe key ideas, concepts and theories and select and deploy analytical techniques to analyse the changing dynamics of work and the global movement of labour
- Employ comparative analysis of how these ideas can be developed for policy and practice across differing country contexts to gain a critical comprehension of the issues involved
- Conceptualise and critically analyse public policies and empirical evidence relating to work and labour mobility across different country contexts

Skills outcomes
Upon completion of this module students will be able to:
Transferable
- Communicate effectively both orally and in writing
- Work effectively both independently and in teams

Subject Specific
-Self-reflect and be open and sensitive to diversity in terms of people, cultures, business and management issues


Syllabus

Indicative content
The module is organised in a series of lectures and seminars and will be grouped into three thematic streams:
Stream 1 ‘Global policy and regulation’ will cover issues such as global challenges relating to work and migration and how these intersect with care, different responses to the crises of care and work and approaches for the analysis of labour market systems.
Stream 2 ‘Crises of labour’ will look at topics such as the regulation of labour markets (national and international), national and international dimensions of unemployment and
underemployment, and policy responses to work beyond retirement and the rise of youth unemployment (case studies).
Stream 3 ‘Labour mobility’ will examine areas such as the regulation of migration, and local labour market segmentation, migrant strategies and organisational responses (case studies).
There will also be a guest lecture from a policymaker, practitioner or visiting scholar.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture101.5015.00
Seminar101.5015.00
Private study hours270.00
Total Contact hours30.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

The 10-week module will comprise a total of 300 student study hours. This includes 30 contact hours (averaging 3 hours per week) and 270 non-contact hours for independent study.

The contact hours will include taught lectures and seminars. The seminars will incorporate small group learning and discussions using interactive case study examples as well as plenary discussions.

The non-contact hours will comprise students’ private study and independent learning, including: subject matter and case study readings prior to and during the module and reading of key texts prior to seminars; research and collaboration in small groups in seminars; and additional private study to further students’ own knowledge and understanding of the topics, theories and concepts considered.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

The module team will facilitate and monitor all seminar sessions involving group learning, enabling the progress of both the small groups and the individual students to be assessed. The combination of the lecture presentations and accompanying seminar discussions will enable monitoring of student progress. It also enables feedback to be provided to students throughout the module, both by the module team and by peers, helping the students to continually enhance their performance over the course of the module.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Report3000 word individual assignment85.00
PresentationGroup presentation15.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

The resit for this module will be 100% by 3,000 words coursework

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 30/04/2019

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