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2015/16 Taught Postgraduate Module Catalogue

PIED5225M Democracy and Development

30 creditsClass Size: 15

Module manager: Professor Gordon Crawford
Email: G.Crawford@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 View Timetable

Year running 2015/16

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module examines the inter-relationship between democratisation and socio-economic development in the developing world. Both dimensions are explored: the impact of democracy on socio-economic development and vice versa. Such issues have attracted particular attention since the early 1990s, coinciding with the post-cold war shift to the promotion of democracy and good governance by international development agencies. This 'new policy orthodoxy' is subjected to critical examination, including issues of political conditionality and international democracy promotion. The role of democracy in post-conflict reconstruction is examined, investigating the risks involved as well as the institutional forms that are most suitable for post-conflict societies. The impact of different forms of democracy (formal democracy, participatory democracy etc) on socio-economic progress is explored, including ways by which social movements and civil society organisations interact with formal political processes in attempts to achieve social change. The role of women in democracy movements is examined, as well as the impact of democracy on women and gender relations. Issues of human rights and development are addressed, focusing on a rights-based approach and the UN Right to Development. Notions of participatory democracy are explored, for instance participatory budgeting in Brazilian cities such as Porto Alegre. Theoretical debates on issues such as decentralisation are informed by empirical evidence, including regional or country case-studies selected by module participants.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:
- understand and critically analyse the debates concerning the inter-relationship between socio-economic development and democracy;
- gather, organise and present evidence and data from a regional or country case-study to support or to challenge variant theoretical views;
- define and differentiate various concepts of development and democracy;
- explore to what extent and in what ways the twin objectives of a democratic political system and effective socio-economic development can be achieved;
- investigate the respective roles of different agents, notably international agencies, state institutions and civil society organisations, in democratising development;
- communicate effectively in speech through formal presentation and informal discussion.

Syllabus

- Is democracy a luxury that poor societies can ill afford?
- Alternatively, have 'democracy and good governance' become the new development panacea?

This module examines the inter-relationship between socio-economic development and democratisation in the developing world. Two main dimensions will be explored: the consequences of development for democracy and vice versa.

The positive impact of economic development on prospects for democratisation has been a strong finding of much research, but does this simultaneously undercut efforts to craft democracy in less developed countries?

The influence of democracy on socio-economic development has attracted particular attention since the early 1990s, coinciding with the 'third wave' of democratisation and the post-cold war shift by international development agencies to the promotion of 'democracy and good governance'.

This 'new orthodoxy' of the positive socio-economic consequences of democratisation will be interrogated in a critical but constructive manner. The variable impact of different forms of democracy (formal democracy, popular democracy etc) on socio-economic progress will be explored, including the opportunities and constraints faced by social movements and civil society organisations. The impact of democratisation on gender relations, and the prospects for promoting gender equity, will be examined.

Whilst there is now little support for authoritarian polities per se, the considerable success of the 'rational authoritarianism' of the developmental state in East and Southeast Asia is significant, and prospects for the construction of a democratic developmental state will be investigated.

Theoretical debates will be informed by empirical evidence, including regional or country case-studies selected by module participants.

Teaching methods

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar112.0022.00
Private study hours280.00
Total Contact hours22.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)302.00

Private study


Students will be required to prepare for discussions in seminars through extensive reading of sources listed on the module reading list. In addition to this, students should spend time preparing for their assessments which should include finding and using sources not listed on their reading list.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Seminar presentations and participation.

Methods of assessment


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1 x 6,000 words100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 22/07/2015

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