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2020/21 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

CLAS1400 The Roman World: An Introduction

20 creditsClass Size: 90

Module manager: Dr Henry Clarke
Email: h.h.b.clarke@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2020/21

This module is approved as a discovery module

Module summary

The module is intended as a foundation for further study in all aspects of Roman civilisation. It will start with an introduction to the major periods in Roman history and the surviving ancient evidence which allows us to study them. The first half of the module is then used to explore the development of the Roman political system from the dominance of the senatorial aristocracy in the Republican period to the establishment of autocratic rule by Augustus and the emperors who came after him. In the second half of the module, we turn our attention to aspects of Roman social history, such as patronage, family life and living conditions. In addition, selections from the Natural History of Pliny the Elder, a fascinating encyclopaedic work of the late 1st century A.D., will be studied as suitable entry points into the cultural mindset of the Romans, as we discuss issues such as racism and attitudes towards animals.

Objectives

The module is intended to introduce students to the major events of Roman political history and the social and cultural institutions of the Roman world. It will familiarise students with the evidence used to study this material, and demonstrate the issues and problems involved in handling it. Through seminars and assessed work, it will foster skills which include critical thinking, the ability to organise material and the ability to express and support ideas. The knowledge and skills acquired on the module will serve as a foundation for further work in Classics at levels 2 and 3.

Learning outcomes
Students completing this module are expected to have acquired:
- a knowledge of major Roman political institutions and events.
- a knowledge of major Roman social and cultural institutions.
- a familiarity with the primary evidence normally used to explore both.
- an understanding of issues and problems involved in the use of that primary evidence.
- a familiarity with modern scholarship relating to Roman history
- an ability to engage critically with that scholarship


Syllabus

The module is intended as a foundation for further study in all aspects of Roman civilisation. It will start with an introduction to the major periods in Roman history and the surviving ancient evidence which allows us to study them. The first half of the module is then used to explore the development of the Roman political system from the dominance of the senatorial aristocracy in the Republican period to the establishment of autocratic rule by Augustus and the emperors who came after him. In the second half of the module, we turn our attention to aspects of Roman social history, such as patronage, family life and living conditions. In addition, selections from the Natural History of Pliny the Elder, a fascinating encyclopaedic work of the late 1st century A.D., will be studied as suitable entry points into the cultural mindset of the Romans, as we discuss issues such as racism and attitudes towards animals.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture211.0021.00
Seminar51.005.00
Private study hours174.00
Total Contact hours26.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

The 173 private study hours comprise:

60 hours – lecture-related reading and note-taking (20 x 3 hours)
40 hours – seminar reading and preparation (5 x 8 hours)
33 hours – researching and writing the essay (40%)
40 hours – revising for the exam (60%)

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

As this is a core module for students on the Classical Civilisation and Ancient History programmes, student progress is monitored carefully and regularly in order to provide formative feedback and help students to adjust to working at University level. Formative feedback is provided by the seminar classes, where students articulate their ideas as part of discussion with their peers and the seminar tutor. The written assignment then provides summative feedback part-way through the semester, offering a clear formal assessment of progress at a point well in advance of the final exam. Finaly, the exam tests the level of attainment at the point when students have completed the module.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
EssayAn essay of not more than 1,500 words40.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)40.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Online Time-Limited assessment2 hr 00 mins60.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)60.00

The format of this examination may be subject to change should the situation surrounding the Covid-19 pandemic allow. Students will be informed well in advance if this becomes the case.

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 02/10/2020 13:48:14

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