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2020/21 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

MEDI1220 Body Systems

Module manager: Dr Erica Di-Martino
Email: e.dimartino@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2020/21

Pre-requisite qualifications

Successful admission into year 1 MBChB programme.

Co-requisites

MEDI1204Individuals and Populations
MEDI1213Research, Evaluation and Special Studies 1
MEDI1214Innovation, Development, Enterprise, Leadership and Safety 1
MEDI1215Campus to Clinic 1
MEDI1216Introduction to Medical Sciences
MEDI1218RESS 1 Special Studies Project

Module replaces

MEDI1217, MEDI1203

This module is not approved as a discovery module

Objectives

With respect to the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems; by the end of the module students will be able to:

1. Describe normal human development, structure and functions.
2. Explain the scientific bases for common disease presentations.
3. Explain the fundamental principles underlying common investigative techniques.
4. Interpret findings from basic physiological measurements.
5. Demonstrate basic knowledge of the drugs and other therapies used to treat common conditions affecting these systems


Learning outcomes
The respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems in health and normality are studied. Students are taught to recognise the boundary of health with disease. By then end of the module students should be able to identify:
1) How the respiratory system protects itself and ensures efficient gas exchange and acid-base balance.
2) The role of the cardiovascular system in ensuring the adequate supply and return of blood for all body parts.
3) The mechanism by which the gastrointestinal system and associated organs ensure the effective digestion, absorptions and utilisation of nutrients.
4) The role of the renal system in ensuring that appropriate fluid volume and blood pH are maintained.
5) Key features of the reproductive system in conception, the maintenance of the developing foetus, and parturition.
6) How the disturbance of structure or function or both results in disease.
7) How prevention and management of common body system diseases is best achieved.
8) The mechanism by which drugs and other therapies are used to treat common diseases affecting these systems.

Skills outcomes
Application of scientific principles to medical practice as appropriate:

1) Practising the measurement of relevant parameters e.g. pulse, blood pressure, electrocardiogram, respiratory function test, urine testing, etc.
2) Developing awareness of relevant clinical investigations and systems monitoring.





Syllabus

The respiratory, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal and reproductive systems in health and normality are studied. Students are taught to recognise the boundary of health with disease and the unit provides students with an integrated scientific and clinical understanding of these systems.

Module syllabus outline:

Cardiovascular System

Normal structure and function: gross anatomy of the cardiovascular system, cardiac muscle function, the cardiac cycle, nervous input to the heart, mechanics of blood flow, circulatory routes, arteries, veins and microcirculation. Transport functions, red cell and platelet function, haemostasis and fibrinolysis. Blood pressure, normal alterations (orthostasis and exercise) and control mechanisms.
Development of the heart, foetal circulation and circulation in the neonate.
Basic principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of common disorders, heart failure, stroke, disorders of rhythm, myocardial ischaemia, peripheral vascular disease.
Pharmacology of the cardiovascular system.


Respiratory System

Normal structure and function: gross anatomy of the lungs and airways, pulmonary circulation, mechanics of breathing, principles of gas exchange, oxygen and carbon dioxide transport, acid-base balance, neural control of breathing.
Early lung development and respiratory system changes at birth.
Basic principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of common disorders, respiratory failure, asthma and other chronic obstructive airway disease, pneumonia, lung cancer.
Pharmacology of the respiratory system.

Gastrointestinal system

Normal structure and function: gross anatomy of the digestive tract, liver, biliary system and pancreas, the physiological and biochemical processes, including the nervous and hormonal signals, required for the normal digestion and absorption of food, and the movement of the gastro-intestinal contents. The processes involved in the transport of nutrients from the gut, its metabolism, storage, mobilisation and distribution.
Development of the digestive tract and ancillary organs.
Components of a healthy diet, the principal physiological and biochemical functions, and the pathological consequences observed in deficiency states.
Basic principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of common disorders including peptic ulceration, inflammatory bowel disease, type one and type two diabetes.
Pharmacology of the gastrointestinal system.

Renal System

Normal structure and function: gross anatomy of the kidneys and genitor-urinary system, structure of the nephron, renal function, glomerular filtration and production of urine. Renal control of fluid balance, sodium balance, potassium balance, acid-base balance, diuretics.
The urinary tract and control of micturition.
Endocrine functions of the kidney.
Development of the renal system.
Basic principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of common disorders- acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease and hypertension.
Basic principles of kidney transplantation.
Pharmacology of the renal system.

Reproductive System

Normal structure and function: gross anatomy of the male and female reproductive organs, gametogenesis, male and female reproductive physiology, conception, pregnancy, parturition and lactation, contraception.
Development of the male and female reproductive organs.
Basic principles of clinical diagnosis and treatment of common disorders including disorders of menstruation, male and female infertility.
Pharmacology of the reproductive system.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
On-line Learning42.008.00
Class tests, exams and assessment21.002.00
Lecture671.0067.00
Practical72.0014.00
Practical73.0021.00
Seminar93.0027.00
Seminar132.0026.00
Tutorial41.004.00
Private study hours131.00
Total Contact hours169.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)300.00

Private study

Additional reading and reviewing lecture notes, consolidation and revision.
Preparation for work sessions/clinical symposia.
Completion of histology workbooks, on-line quizzes.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Student progress is monitored through attendance and contribution to small group teaching sessions. A formative spot test examination is used to monitor progress in gross anatomy five weeks into the module. In addition to formal testing of students knowledge and understanding, there will be regular assessments for learning, allowing students to self-test and receive feedback on their progress. These will be provided via the VLE, and will take a range of forms, including e-book units with integrated questions, and online quizzes using a variety of question styles.

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 10/11/2020 16:30:26

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