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2021/22 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

EDUC1207 Children's Rights and Social Justice

20 creditsClass Size: 65

Module manager: Dr Peter Hart
Email: p.j.hart@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2021/22

This module is approved as a discovery module

Module summary

This module explores the development and implementation of children's rights through the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in both national and international contexts. The underpinning philosophies associated with how rights are ascribed, the nature of citizenship and the relationship of the individual to the State are explored along with critiques against this approach and arguments opposing the rights of children. The module provides you with an opportunity to explore from a variety of perspectives the tensions for service providers in balancing competing rights of children, the gap between rhetoric and reality inherent in policy development and legislation, and the theoretical tensions associated with attributing human rights on a universal basis. You will explore case studies to investigate the experiences of marginalised children and young people and consideration is given to how rights based approaches might impact on their everyday worlds.

Objectives

This module investigates the development of children's rights through an exploration of the development and implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child in both national and international contexts.
It aims to:
- Introduce the underpinning philosophies associated with how rights are ascribed, the nature of citizenship and the relationship of the individual to the State, including the perspectives of those who oppose the rights approach as it is applied to children
- Explore, from different perspectives, the tensions for service providers in balancing the competing rights of children, the gap between rhetoric and reality inherent in policy development and legislation, and the theoretical tensions associated with attributing human rights on a universal basis
- Explore case studies to investigate the experiences of marginalised children and young people and consider how rights based approaches might impact on their everyday worlds
- Reflect on how the competing demands for rights are balanced within various aspects of service provision and how meaningful participation can be promoted
- Reflect critically on how children's rights are currently implemented

Learning outcomes
On completion of this module, students should be able to:
1. Demonstrate familiarity with theoretical concepts related to children's rights including children's agency, citizenship, inequality and social justice
2. Understand the distinction between different types of rights, how these are ascribed and how they feature in both legislation, policy and practice
3. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding about how children's rights relate to the provision of services in the UK
4. Use evidence to construct a coherent and structured argument related to the development and implementation of children's rights.


Syllabus

(Italics outline indicative content.)

1 Introduction to the module: What are Rights, What is Social Justice? Lecture: What are rights? Is there a difference between children’s rights and human rights? What is social justice?
2 Will and Interest Theories Lecture: What are the different theoretical perspectives that have emerged to explain children’s entitlements to ‘rights’? These include Will and Interest theories. What are the arguments behind alternative perspectives including those who oppose or restrict children's rights?
3 Rights and relationships Lecture: How do children’s rights relate to their relationships, e.g. with their family? What are the differences between ‘paternalistic’ and ‘empowerment’ approaches to children’s rights? What is meant by ‘developmental rights’ and how does these relate to perspectives on childhood ‘agency’?
4 Social Justice Lecture: What is social justice? How have children been considered in different approaches to social justice? How does social justice relate to rights, for everyone and specifically for children?
5 Legal Perspectives
Lecture: Are children’s rights legal rights? How have legal perspectives on children’s rights developed over time? What are the key international and UK laws relating to children’s rights?
6 Global Dimensions Lecture: Introduction to the UNCRC 1989. How are children’s rights and social justice understood in different national and cultural contexts? What are the challenges of developing international agreements on human and children’s rights?
7 UNCRC 1989: Provision Lecture: The 1st of the ‘3 P’s’: What does the UNCRC 1989 say about what its signatories should provide for children? What policies have developed which support this requirement? Which institutions ‘provide’ for children?
8 UNCRC 1989: Participation Lecture: The 2nd of the ‘3 P’s’: What does the UNCRC 1989 say about children’s participation? What policies have emerged that are consistent with the UNCRC’s articles on participation? Is children’s participation realised in practice? What is good practice in terms of enabling children’s participation?
9 UNCRC 1989: Protection Lecture: The 3rd of the ‘3 P’s’: What does the UNCRC 1989 say about children’s right to be protected? What policies have emerged that are consistent with the UNCRC’s articles on protection? What factors of a child’s development entitle them to be protected? What are we protecting children against? Is the protection of children realised in practice? What is good practice in terms of protecting children?
10 Student Choice The content of this session will be decided in consultation with the students and provides an opportunity to revisit or explore more detail around an ancillary topic. This content will be decided in a democratic and participatory manner.
11 Module Review and Assignment Advice Lecture: Recap of the module, feedback and assignment support and module evaluations. Group Work related to assignment

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture112.0022.00
Seminar32.006.00
Private study hours172.00
Total Contact hours28.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Students will be provided with key readings to discuss each week. Additionally students will be expected to research their own case studies and conduct wider reading around children's rights and social justice.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

The module is structured around debates, discussion, the analysis of case studies and other weekly tasks providing students with an opportunity to demonstrate their understanding of the key concepts on the module. Thus tutors will be able to monitor student progress towards the assessment.
Group tutorial sessions will be provided to support students selecting specific essay titles.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1 x 2000 words100.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 13/09/2021

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