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2022/23 Undergraduate Programme Catalogue

BSc Social Policy, Sociology and Crime

Programme code:BS-SOCP/S&CUCAS code:
Duration:3 Years Method of Attendance: Full Time
Programme manager:Dr Simon Prideaux Contact address:s.j.prideaux@leeds.ac.uk

Total credits: 360

Entry requirements:

School/Unit responsible for the parenting of students and programme:

School of Sociology & Social Policy

Examination board through which the programme will be considered:

School of Sociology & Social Policy

Relevant QAA Subject Benchmark Groups:

QAA Subject Benchmark Group: Social Policy (in part) and Sociology (in part)
https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/subject-benchmark-statement-social-policy.pdf?sfvrsn=64e2cb81_4

https://www.qaa.ac.uk/docs/qaa/subject-benchmark-statements/subject-benchmark-statement-sociology.pdf?sfvrsn=6ee2cb81_4

Programme specification:

Our Social Policy, Sociology and Crime degree is a unique interdisciplinary programme that examines the changing nature of social relations, the role of social problems in our everyday lives and how institutions of the state respond to them. As part of this programme, you learn about the inequalities that undermine the rights and recognition of marginalised groups and what role social policy can play in maximising our individual and collective welfare. You will learn about the social and political construction of deviance, including who and what comes to be recognised as 'criminal'. In doing so, you will investigate how certain behaviours and populations are regulated and whose interests these government interventions serve.

Through the course of your degree, you will investigate the dynamics between individuals and wider society and the contemporary challenges facing social policy that extend beyond national borders and discrete policy domains. By engaging with social theory, historical evidence and practical policy issues, your studies will draw on key thinkers across a range of fields to develop a deep understanding of the drivers behind particular social policies and their (often unintended) effects on individuals and civil society. At the same time, you will explore how policy areas such as poverty, health, housing, education and street-level crime (as opposed to the crimes of powerful elites and governments) have come to be seen and portrayed as social problems. Across these areas, this programme will help you question the methods and extent to which different states do or do not provide for the welfare of its citizens or effectively tackle their social problems. By connecting 'evidence-based' policy issues facing contemporary societies to social theory, you will be able to comprehend why social problems persist and identify what can be done about them. A wide range of optional modules are available allowing you to tailor your degree to your individual interests and study key topics in more detail such as disability rights, terrorism, discrimination and childhood.

The programme will provide the opportunity for students to combine sociological theory with the critical and creative aspects of the discipline of social policy and the policy area of crime. Students will study crime and deviance from both a policy and theoretical perspective as well as consider the impact of the welfare state on questions of poverty and social exclusion, racial justice, gender recognition, disability, climate change and globalisation. They will have the opportunity to deploy and combine various techniques of analysis and enquiry contained within the fields of Social Policy, Sociology and Crime to develop a conceptual understanding of policy debates and describe and comment on particular aspects of scholarship and recent research. Study in the programme is thus structured in ways that provides breadth, depth, proficiency in the application of policy analysis (both in term of the 'social' and the 'anti-social') and an aptitude towards theoretical concepts in quantitative or qualitative research. Crucially, opportunities will be provided for students to develop interests and informed opinions through autonomous study.

Ultimately, students will be able to apply their knowledge, skills and understanding in a final year/level dissertation. This will provide students with the conceptual understanding required for future employment across a wide range fields in the public, private and charitable sector, including employment spheres relating to crime or criminal justice. Students will graduate with key transferrable skills developed in policy analysis and evaluation, critical thinking, research methods and collaborative working.


Year1 - View timetable

[Learning Outcomes, Transferable (Key) Skills, Assessment]

In level 1, students must pass 100 credits and all core modules as identified in the programme.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates will be required to study the following compulsory modules:

SLSP1160Understanding and Researching the City20 credits 
SLSP1180Crime and Deviance20 credits 
SLSP1190Identities, Inequalities and Policy in Contemporary Society20 credits 
SLSP1220Social Policy: Poor Laws to the Present20 credits 

Discovery modules:

Candidates will be required to study 20 credits of discovery modules.


Year2 - View timetable

[Learning Outcomes, Transferable (Key) Skills, Assessment]

In order to be eligible for an honours degree, students must meet the normal Rules for Award by passing all modules which are designated to be passed for award or progression and by passing the required number of credits at each level as specified in the Curricular Regulations (at least 200 credits at level 2 or above, of which at least 100 should be at level 3). Students must pass at least 100 credits at Level 2 and all core modules to proceed to the next level of the programme.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates will be required to study the following compulsory modules:

SLSP2010Sociology and Social Policy Research Methods20 credits 
SLSP2020Crime, Law and Regulation20 credits 
SLSP2650Key Debates in Social Policy20 credits 
SLSP2730Central Problems in Sociology20 credits 

Optional modules:

Candidates are required to study 20 credits from the following optional modules:

FOSS2001State of Emergency: Social science and the COVID-19 pandemic20 credits 
LAW2420Youth Crime and Justice20 credits 
LLLC2222Violent and Sexually Offending Young People20 credits 
SLSP2040Disability Studies: An Introduction20 credits 
SLSP2050The Sociology of Gender20 credits 
SLSP2145Crime, Race and Ethnicity20 credits 
SLSP2150Debates in Childhood and Youth20 credits 

Discovery modules:

Candidates may study up to 20 credits of discovery modules.


Year3 - View timetable

[Learning Outcomes, Transferable (Key) Skills, Assessment]

In order to be eligible for an honours degree, students must meet the normal Rules for Award by passing all modules which are designated to be passed for award or progression and by passing the required number of credits at each level as specified in the Curricular Regulations (at least 200 credits at level 2 or above, of which at least 100 should be at level 3). Students must pass at least 100 credits at Level 3 and all core modules to proceed to gain the degree.

Compulsory modules:

Candidates will be required to study the following compulsory module:

SLSP3095Research Skills for your Dissertation20 credits 

Optional modules:

Candidates are required to study one of the following 40 credit dissertation modules:

SLSP3041Sociology Dissertation40 credits 
SLSP3051Social Policy Dissertation40 credits 
SLSP3200Dissertation in Crime40 credits 

Candidates are required to study at least 40 credits from the following optional modules:

LAW3160Policing20 credits 
LAW3173Technology, Crime and Justice20 credits 
SLSP3075Disability and Development20 credits 
SLSP3211State Crime and Immorality20 credits 
SLSP3220Contemporary Children, Young People and Families20 credits 
SLSP3500Gender, Technologies and the Body20 credits 
SLSP3995Ethnicity and Popular Culture20 credits 

Discovery modules:

Candidates may study up to 20 credits of discovery modules.

Last updated: 29/07/2021 16:57:30

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