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2006/07 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ARTF2093 Antiquity: Survival and Revival

20 creditsClass Size: 30

Module manager: Dr Kerry Bristol
Email: k.a.c.bristol@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2006/07

Pre-requisites

Students must have completed at least 20 credits from the following: ARTF1005, ARTF1006, ARTF1007, ARTF1008, ARTF1041, ARTF1042, ARTF2000

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

PRE-REQUISITES: Students wishing to take this module as an elective must have completed at least 20 credits from the following modules: ARTF1005, ARTF1006, ARTF1007, ARTF1008, ARTF1041, ARTF1042 or ARTF2000This module explores the cultural contexts of European 'renaissances' of ancient Greece and Rome, engaging students in critical analysis of the important debates centred on the formation of theories of the antique. Case studies will be supplemented through study of significant monuments and texts on themes which may include the following: the art market and archaeological excavation in eighteenth century Rome, Pompeii and Herculaneum before and after Napoleonic occupation, the Hellenic Ideal: from Greece to Greek Revival, the grotteschi interior from Raphael to Robert Adam, second Romes: imitation of Rome in Constantinople and imitations of Constantinople in Aachen, Paris and elsewhere, antiquity and the medieval/early Renaissance city state, classicism in nineteenth century European painting and sculpture, history painting and the French Academy, the printed image, and the role of the archaeological treatise.Assessment: 1 x 1hour exam (50%) and 1 x 2,000 - 3,000 word essay (50%)

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

* demonstrate a critical understanding of the key texts and monuments of the visual culture of ancient Greece and Rome and/or its 'renaissances';
* critically analyse specific case studies;
* discuss critically the social and ideological formation of theories of the antique and its 'renaissances' and the disputes to which they give rise.

Skills outcomes
Verbal and written fluency in constructing a logical and coherent argument.
Use of audio visual aids
Participation in group discussions
Co-ordination and dissemination of a range of historical, contextual visual information
Using bibliographies and databases
Verbal and written fluency in constructing a logical and coherent argument.
Use of audio visual aids
Participation in group discussions
Co-ordination and dissemination of a range of historical, contextual visual information
Using bibliographies and databases


Syllabus

This module explores the cultural contexts of European and American 'renaaissances' of ancient Greece and Rome, engaging students in critical analysis of the important debates centred on the formation of theories of the antique. Case studies will be supplemented through study of significant monuments and texts on a number of themes which may include the following:

* theory and practice in ancient Greece;
* the art market and archaeological excavation in eighteenth century Rome;
* Pompeii and Hurculaneum before and after Napoleonic occupation;
* the Hellenic ideal: from Greece to Greek revival;
* the groteschi interior from Raphael to Robert Adam;
* second Romes: imitation of Rome in constantinople and images of Constantinople in Aachen, Paris and elsewhere;
* antiquity and the medieval/early Renaissance city state;
* classicism in 19th century European painting and sculpture;
* history painting and the French academy;
* the printed image;
* the role of the archaeological treatise;
* classicism and the 20th century totalitarian state.

A detailed syllabus of weekly topics and readings will be provided in advance of the first session.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Lectures 10 x 1 hour; Seminars 10 x 1 hour.

Private study

180 hours reading, essay/class/presentation preparation

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Attendance at seminars/lectures
Participation in class discussions
Presentations

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

1 x 2000-3000 word (50%)
1 x 1 hour examination (50%).

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 04/06/2007

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