Module and Programme Catalogue

Search site

Find information on

2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ARTF3049 Figures and Fragments: Sculpture in Anglo-Saxon England

20 creditsClass Size: 18

Module manager: Prof. Catherine E. Karkov
Email: c.e.karkov@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

Pre-requisites

ARTF1041Museum/Country House Studies 1
ARTF1042Museum/Country House Studies 2
ARTF1045A Story of Art I
ARTF1046A Story of Art 2

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture is the earliest sculpture to survive from what was politically and culturally identified as 'England'. It played a significant role in the creation and expansion of the English church (and state), the construction of English identity, and the establishment of hierarchies of class, gender, ethnicity and belief, yet it remains studied most frequently for what it tells us about religious practices and artistic sources alone. This module looks at sculpture as an active participant in the establishment and promulgation of a set of interrelated ideologies, rather than as a passive mirror of liturgical practice or iconographic influences. It also considers Anglo-Saxon sculpture as sculpture, and not just a series of three-dimensional texts.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should:
- developed their knowledge of the ideologies and processes behind creation, siting and display of Anglo-Saxon sculpture;
- be able to understand both primary and secondary theoretical/critical texts and their relationship to visual culture and its interpretation, and assess and discuss the key debates relevant to the art of the early Middle Ages and its Historiography.

Skills outcomes
- Verbal and written fluency in constructing a logical and coherent argument
- Textual analysis of primary and secondary sources
- Research skills
- Participation in seminar discussions
- Use of Audio Visual aids
- Analysis of art.


Syllabus

Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture is the earliest sculpture to survive from what was politically and culturally identified as 'England'. It played a significant role in the creation and expansion of the English church (and state), the construction of English identity, and the establishment of hierarchies of class, gender, ethnicity and belief, yet it remains studied most frequently for what it tells us about religious practices and artistic sources alone.

This module looks at sculpture as an active participant in the establishment and promulgation of a set of interrelated ideologies, rather than as a passive mirror of liturgical practice or iconographic influences. It also considers Anglo-Saxon sculpture as sculpture, and not just a series of three-dimensional texts.

Before the seminar begins you should familiarize yourself with Anglo-Saxon England and its sculpture. The best introuduction to the study of Anglo-Saxon stone sculpture is Richard N. Bailey's England's Earliest Sculptors (Toronto, 1996).

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar102.0020.00
Private study hours180.00
Total Contact hours20.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

- Directed study of primary and secondary sources in preparation for seminar discussions - 50%
- Preparation, writing and research for seminar presentations and essays - 40%
- Study visits to museums and churches - 10%.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

- Participation in seminar discussions
- Assessment of mid-semester project report.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay2,000-3,000 words75.00
Project2,000 words25.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 21/05/2010

Disclaimer

Browse Other Catalogues

Errors, omissions, failed links etc should be notified to the Catalogue Team.PROD

© Copyright Leeds 2019