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2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ARTF3162 The Renaissance and Reformation in Northern and Eastern Europe, circa 1450-1600

20 creditsClass Size: 18

Module manager: Dr. Urszula Szulakowska
Email: u.s.szulakowska@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

Pre-requisites

ARTF2103Renaissance Art and Architecture North and South of the Alps
ARTF2108European Art in the High Renaissance and the Counter Reforma

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

PRE-REQUISITES: Students wishing to take this module as an elective at level three must have completed at least 20 credits from ARTF 2000 or any other level two ARTF coded module.This module questions the nature of the 'Renaissance' in northern and eastern Europe in relation to enduring late medieval traditions such as Gothic or Byzantine influences. Case studies in the art of France, the Low Countries and the German-speaking territories will be considered. Selected examples from eastern Europe will also be discussed, for example, areas such as Bohemia and Hungary in the Holy Roman Empire, or the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, or the Ruthene borderlands (contemporary Ukraine). This leads to a critical examination of the notion of 'centre' and 'periphery' in the writings of those historians who have evaluated northern European artistic and cultural developments using the model of the Italian Renaissance. Artistic practice will be studied within socio-economic and political contexts. There will be a special emphasis on comprehending the history of the German Reformation and its effects on art-practice. Students will also have the option of studying art inspired by the Orthodox Church in eastern Europe.Assessment: 1 x 1 hour exam (50%) and 1 x 2 - 3,000 word essay (50%).

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should:
- be able to undertake a critical analysis of visual and textual documentation relating to the art-history of the northern and eastern European Renaissance and Reformation;
- be competent in the use of a variety of interpretative methods drawn from the history of art, social and political history, as well as from recent critical cultural theory and feminism;
- understand how ideas were exchanged north and south of the Alps between artists, intellectuals and patrons;
- be able to comprehend the explosive religious history of the period, the socio-political and economic causes of the Reformation and the consequence for art-practice in northern Europe;
- have knowledge of key visual images from this period and should be able to carry-out independent research into the art-history of the period.

Skills outcomes
- Verbal and written fluency in constructing a logical and coherent argument
- Use of audio visual aids
- Participation in group discussions
- Co-ordination and dissemination of a range of historical, contextual and visual information
- Using bibliographies and databases.


Syllabus

Questions will be raised concerning the nature of the "Renaissance" in northern and eastern Europe from circa 1450 to 1600 in relation to enduring late-medieval regional traditions, such as Gothic or Byzantine influences. Case-studies in the art of France, the Low Countries and the German-speaking territories will be considered. Selected examples from the art-history of eastern Europe will also be discussed, for example, areas such as Bohemia and Hungary in the Holy Roman Empire, or the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, or the Ruthene borderlands (contemporary Ukraine).

Students will have the option of selecting a particular area and time-period for their own private study in preparation for their essays and seminar presentations. This will lead to a critical examination of the notion of "centre" and "periphery" in the writings of those art historians who have evaluated northern European artistic and cultural developments in terms of the model of the Italian Renaissance.

Artistic practice will be studied within the appropriate socio-economic and political contexts. There will be a special emphasis on comprehending the history of the German Reformation and its effects on art-practice. Students will also have the option of undertaking a study of the art inspired by the Orthodox Church in eastern Europe.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar102.0020.00
Private study hours180.00
Total Contact hours20.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

- 150 hours: reading in preparation for lectures and seminars (reading is set each week and discussed in class), revision for exam;
- 30 hours: Researching textual and visual materials for set essay.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

- Attendance
- Participation in class discussion
- Unassessed student presentation.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay2,500-3,000 words50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)1 hr 00 mins50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 21/05/2010

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