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2006/07 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ENGL32280 Tragedy: Classical to Neo-Classical

20 creditsClass Size: 40

English

Module manager: Professor Paul Hammond
Email: p.f.hammond@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2006/07

Pre-requisite qualifications

THIS MODULE IS ONLY AVAILABLE AS AN ELECTIVE TO STUDENTS IN THE FACULTY OF ARTS.
Grade B at 'A' Level in English Language or Literature or equivalent or an achieved mark of 56 or above in a Level 1 module in English. Candidates who do not meet this pre-requisite should consult Professor Hammond.

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

From the time of the ancient Greeks, tragedy has been the genre through which human beings have asked some of their most profound and searching questions. The first part of the module focuses on Greek tragedies by Aeschylus and Sophocles, and on the adaptation of Greek myth by the Roman dramatist and philosopher Seneca. The second part moves to the Renaissance and the seventeenth century, when classical stories and motifs are adapted by both English and French playwrights to articulate questions which trouble their societies. Recurring issues will include: how tragedy imagines the individual in conflict with society; how society?s language and values are called into question; how revenge, madness and death are treated in different cultures; and how humans attempt to understand the gods. The Greek, Latin, and French plays will be read in translation, but students who know these languages will be welcome to make use of them.Priority will be given to students on named BA programmes with English, with Level 2 students taking priority over Level 3 students on those programmes. Only available as an Elective to students on BA programmes in Arts.

Objectives

To enable students to acquire, through the study of a selection of texts, an understanding of what 'tragedy' has meant, in theory and practice, in the history of the theatre and of literature before 1700. In particular, English Renaissance and Restoration tragedies will be seen in the context of a European classical tradition. Greek, Latin and French texts will be read in translation; and students will be expected to develop an understanding of the texts in their cultural contexts.

Skills outcomes
Skills for effective communication, oral and written.
Capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse.
Ability to acquire quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way.
Capacity for independent thought and judgement.
Critical reasoning.
Research skills, including information retrieval skills, the organisation of material, and the evaluation of its importance.
IT skills.
Time management and organisational skills.
Independent learning.Skills for effective communication, oral and written.
Capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse.
Ability to acquire quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way.
Capacity for independent thought and judgement.
Critical reasoning.
Research skills, including information retrieval skills, the organisation of material, and the evaluation of its importance.
IT skills.
Time management and organisational skills.
Independent learning.


Syllabus

The following plays will be studied, in chronological order: Aeschylus, The Oresteia; Sophocles, Three Theban Plays; Seneca,Thyestes; Kyd, The Spanish Tragedy; Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus; Milton, Samson Agonistes; Dryden; All for Love; Racine, Phhdre.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Teaching will be through weekly seminars (10 x 1 hour) plus up to 5 additional hours (content to be determined by the module tutor).

Private study

Seminar preparation, reading, essay writing.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Contribution to seminars.

1 x 1700 word unassessed essay (Week 7)

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

1 x 4000 word essay (100%) (Week 12)

This essay will only be assessed if the unassessed essay requirement has been met.

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 26/02/2007

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