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2006/07 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

HIST2110 The cult of saints in medieval Europe c.400-c.1500

20 creditsClass Size: 45

Module manager: Dr EM Jamroziak
Email: e.m.jamroziak@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2006/07

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module investigates and explains the importance of the saints' cults in medieval Europe. It will focus on the most significant manifestation of the centrality of these cults to medieval religious and social practices. In particular it will explore the veneration of relics and images, the role of miracles, and the popularity of pilgrimages. The mechanism of 'making saints' and their role of medieval society is investigated though a variety of primary sources from medieval continental Europe and the British Isles. Hagiography as one of the most important medieval literary genres will be examined in relation to the medieval models of holiness in connection to the social roles (e.g. kings, bishops, monks), gender (women-saints) and politics (political martyrs). Since the cult of saints was so central to medieval society its study enables us to understand better many areas of social and political life.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:
- gain a wider knowledge of medieval society and culture, through exploration of the themes of the module
- work collaboratively via seminars in developing substantive knowledge and conceptual analyses
- develop a more profound understanding of particular aspects of the topics covered, primarily through written work
By the end of the module students will have a solid grounding in the form and function of hagiographical texts and the development of cults, local and international, as well as an understanding of their social and political contexts.

Skills outcomes
Enhances Common Skills listed below:

High-level skills in oral and written communication of complex ideas.
Independence of mind and self-discipline and self-direction to work effectively under own initiative.
Ability to locate, handle and synthesize large amounts of information.
Capacity to employ analytical and problem-solving abilities.
Ability to engage constructively with the ideas of their peers, tutors and published sources.
Empathy and active engagement with alternative cultural contexts.


Syllabus

The aim of the module is to investigate and explain the importance of the saints' cults in medieval Europe. It will focus on the most significant manifestation of the centrality of these cults to medieval religious and social practices. In particular it will explore the veneration of relics and images, the role of miracles, and the popularity of pilgrimages. The mechanism of 'making saints' and their role of medieval society is investigated though a variety of primary sources from medieval continental Europe and the British Isles. Hagiography as one of the most important medieval literary genres will be examined in relation to the medieval models of holiness in connection to the social roles (e.g. kings, bishops, monks), gender (women-saints) and politics (political martyrs). Since the cult of saints was so central to medieval society its study enables us to understand better many areas of social and political life.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Lectures11 x 1 hour


Tutorials 6 x 1 hour


Private study

Exam preparation; researching, preparing, and writing assignments; undertaking set reading; and self-directed reading around the topic.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Contributions to class discussions, one assessed essay plan worth 10% of module marks, an assessed essay.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

One 2-hour examination at the end of the teaching semester (60%);
1 x 2,000 word assessed essay to be handed in teaching week 10 (30%);
essay plan (10%)

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 24/07/2007

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