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2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

HIST2121 Fraternity, Skill and the Politics of Labour, 1660-1870

20 creditsClass Size: 28

Module manager: Dr Malcolm Chase
Email: m.s.chase@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

Labour history is changing, especially the historical study of trade unions. Once dominated by narrow, institutionalised narratives, the field has been enlivened by the growth of interest in the experience of work in pre- and early-industrial society, and in the broader culture of self-help from which trade unions emerged. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the range and findings of this work, and to consider it in relation to current debates about industrialisation, the nature of class, the role of the State, and issues of skill and gender. There's a lot more to this module than the Tolpuddle Martyrs, for example: the history of work and the culture of the workplace; wage earners' organisations in medieval and early modern England; gilds, freemasonary and friendly societies; property in skill and gender relations in the age of manufactures; labour and unrest circa 1789-1824; State regulation of fraternal organisations; the idea of general unionism; industrialisation, fraternity and class; trade unionism in the age of the Chartists; trade unionism and social stability.

Objectives

On completion of this module, students should be able to:
- demonstrate an informed understanding of the development of workplace cultures and in the period circa 1660-1870;
- relate their understanding to a critical appreciation of broader contextual issues, for example the concept of skill, gender relations, economic growth, class, the role of the State;
- handle problems of continuity and change over time;
- through tutorials and an assessed coursework book, analyse some representative contemporary sources for the study of labour history, especially trade societies and kindred fraternal associations early ;
- demonstrate skills of historical analysis orally, and in writing.

Skills outcomes
Enhances Common Skills listed below:

High-level skills in oral and written communication of complex ideas.
Independence of mind and self-discipline and self-direction to work effectively under own initiative.
Ability to locate, handle and synthesize large amounts of information.
Capacity to employ analytical and problem-solving abilities.
Ability to engage constructively with the ideas of their peers, tutors and published sources.
Empathy and active engagement with alternative cultural contexts.


Syllabus

Introduction; the history of work and the culture of the workplace; wage earners' organisations in medieval and early modern England; fraternity in the long eighteenth century Britain - gilds, freemasonry and friendly societies; property in skill and gender relations in the age of manufactures; labour and unrest circa 1789-1824; State regulation of fraternal organisations; the idea of general unionism; industrialisation, trade unionism and class; the strike wave of 1842; case studies (e.g. ceramics, iron and coal miners; engineers; cotton; woollens and worsted; the Sheffield metal trades; 'the Tolpuddle Martyrs'); trade unionism and social stability.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Tutorial61.006.00
Private study hours183.00
Total Contact hours17.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Exam preparation; researching, preparing, and writing assignments; undertaking set reading; and self-directed reading around the topic.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Contributions to class discussions, an assessed coursework book worth 10% of module marks, an assessed essay.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay1 x 2,000 word assessed essay to be delivered Friday Week 730.00
Written WorkCoursework book10.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)40.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)2 hr 00 mins60.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)60.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 29/04/2009

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