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2007/08 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

HIST3310 Policing and the State, Northern Ireland, 1921-2000

40 creditsClass Size: 19

Module manager: Dr Georgina Sinclair
Email: G.S.Sinclair@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semesters 1 & 2 (Sep to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2007/08

This module is not approved as an Elective

Objectives

Specials aim to provide 'hands-on' experience of the historian's task through close examination and evaluation of primary sources and the light they shed on issues and problems. This particular module focuses upon the nature of policing in Northern Ireland from 1920-1970.

The aim of this course is to engage in critical analysis of many of the key issues surrounding 'the police' (the institution and the various forms it takes) and 'policing' (the activity). Throughout the course students will consider how policing underpins various conceptions of social order and strategies for their maintenance. The module will focus upon six major themes. 1) An analysis of the development of policing in Ireland throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; 2) the concept of 'colonial' policing in Ireland and the colonies compared to English policing; 3) various dimensions of policing, such as police activity, how it operated both theoretically and practically, questions of accountability, impartiality and independence; 4) the concept of policing a divided society and the links between policing and entrenched social divisions; 5) policing public disorder and terrorism; 6) 20th century police reform in Northern Ireland.

Skills outcomes
Further enhances Common Skills listed below:

High-level skills in oral and written communication of complex ideas.
Independence of mind and self-discipline and self-direction to work effectively under own initiative.
Ability to locate, handle and synthesize large amounts of information.
Capacity to employ analytical and problem-solving abilities.
Ability to engage constructively with the ideas of their peers, tutors and published sources.
Empathy and active engagement with alternative cultural contexts.
Plus:
Skills in interpretation and analysis of complex documentary-based material.


Syllabus

From the partition of Ireland in 1920 up until the breakdown of public order in 1969, the Ulster Unionists dominated the government of Northern Ireland. The need to maintain state security was an integral part of their political, social and legal practices under the constitution. The Royal Ulster Constabulary and its auxiliary forces were used as part of this overall process of control. With the release of new documents to the National Archives it is now possible to examine in detail the role of the police and their relationship with the state and the public during this period. This module aims to enable students to engage in critical analysis of many of the key issues surrounding 'the police' (the institution and the various forms it takes) and 'policing' (the activity). Throughout the course students will consider how policing underpins various conceptions of social order and strategies for their maintenance. The module will focus upon six major themes. 1) An analysis of the development of policing in Ireland throughout the nineteenth and twentieth centuries; 2) the concept of 'colonial' policing in Ireland and the colonies compared to English policing; 3) various dimensions of policing, such as police activity, how it operated both theoretically and practically, questions of accountability, impartiality and independence; 4) the concept of policing a divided society and the links between policing and entrenched social divisions; 5) policing public disorder and terrorism; 6) 20th century police reform in Northern Ireland.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Seminar222.0044.00
Private study hours356.00
Total Contact hours44.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)400.00

Private study

Exam preparation; researching, preparing, and writing assignments; undertaking set reading; and self-directed reading around the topic.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Contributions to class discussions, two assessed essays, an oral exercise worth 10% of module marks

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Oral PresentationFormat to be determined by tutor. Can be resat with 'an equivalent written exercise'10.00
Essay1 x 3,000 word written exercise or equivalent to be submitted by 12noon on Friday of the second week of the January examination period.20.00
Essay1 x 3,000 word written exercise or equivalent to be submitted by 12noon on Monday of the May revision week.20.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)50.00

10% oral presentations are redone with 'an equivalent written exercise'


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)3 hr 50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 09/01/2008

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