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2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

SLSP1120 Central Debates in Welfare

20 creditsClass Size: 250

Module manager: Dr Simon Prideaux
Email: s.j.prideaux@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

Module replaces

SLSP1032 Current Debates in Welfare

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

What do we mean by 'welfare'? Is there an 'underclass'? What are our rights and responsibilities as citizens? Should rights be shared equally by everyone or should they be conditional? To answer these important questions, the module explores 2 prominent themes within contemporary welfare debates. On the one hand, we look at welfare dependency theory, Titmuss - Social Divisions of Welfare Thesis and then the 'Universalism Vs Diversity' debate within social policy. On the other, we examine Marshall's concept of citizenship (circa 1950) and assess its continued relevance in the light of extensive critiques and recent challenges such as the emergence of EU citizenship and increased migration. Students without an A level in Social Sciences are at no disadvantage. Contact: Dr Simon Prideaux S.J.Prideaux@leeds.ac.uk or undergradsociologysocialpolicy@leeds.ac.uk

Objectives

On successful completion of this module, students will be able to demonstrate in-depth knowledge and understanding of some key contemporary welfare debates which relate to social divisions and welfare, citizenship and welfare, welfare dependency, demographic change and dependency ratios, poverty and responses to it, and contemporary welfare issues. They will be able to evaluate critically the implications and importance that social divisions, citizenship and welfare, demographic change and dependency ratios have for contemporary welfare debates; make oral and written presentations on topics in this field of study which are cogent, coherent and logically structured; undertake independent research within the structure of a guided and indicative reading list.

Skills outcomes
Presentational skills, written skills, independent learning skills, IT skills.Presentational skills, written skills, independent learning skills, IT skills.


Syllabus

The module explores some current issues and themes within contemporary welfare debates. The areas of study offered are: 'Welfare Dependency Theory' focuses on social divisions of welfare via examination and critique of the 'Underclass debate', debates surrounding dependency and independence, lone mothers/feckless fathers, Titmuss's social division of welfare thesis and social changes that are current within contemporary social policy. 'Marshall and Citizenship Theory' examines Marshall's notion of citizenship (circa 1950) and assesses its continued relevance in the light of more recent developments/changes to the British post-war welfare settlement and existing social divisions organised around class, 'race' and gender. Key concepts such as rights and responsibilities, need, contribution, desert are also discussed. Drawing on examples of economic migration and asylum seekers the module introduces students to the role of research in addressing policy issues. The module also explores a third area; social and political changes that are relevant to current debates; ie New Labour/Third Way thinking and Welfare, the role of the media and popular culture in setting policy agendas, and social rights within the EU.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Tutorial101.0010.00
Private study hours179.00
Total Contact hours21.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Essay and exam: 100 hours;
Reading for lectures: 39 hours;
Preparation for tutorials: 40 hours.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Attendance and presentations.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay2,000 words50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)2 hr 00 mins50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 18/01/2010

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