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2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

SLSP1130 Social Welfare and Social Change

20 creditsClass Size: 550

Module manager: Dr Simon Prideaux
Email: s.j.prideaux@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

Module replaces

SLSP1042 Analysing the Development of Welfare

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

Social Welfare and Social Change provides an essential background for learning and thinking about contemporary social policy and institutions. This module explores the social, political, economic and cultural influences that have shaped the post-war welfare state. It shows how the 'Classic Welfare State' of the 1940s rested upon assumptions about the nature of the family, of work and of nationhood that proved to be false. The welfare state was further undermined by a decline in popular deference to professional authority and, crucially, by ideological critiques of the post-war settlement. The module examines these critiques and the work of some of the thinkers upon which they drew. The so-called 'Thatcherite' and 'New Labour' welfare settlements are examined in this context, and the differences and commonalities between them are explored.Students without an A level in Social Sciences are at no disadvantage. Contact: Dr Simon Prideaux S.J.Prideaux@leeds.ac.uk or undergradsociologysocialpolicy@leeds.ac.uk

Objectives

On successful completion of this module students will be able to: demonstrate knowledge of key events in the development of welfare provision in Britain since 1945. They will understand the impact upon welfare provision of changing political ideologies, of changes in family structure and patterns of partnering and parenting, of changes in the nature of work and the level of unemployment, of changing understandings of national identity, and of changes in the authority and status of welfare professionals. They will be able to evaluate the role of political and social movements, and of popular attitudes towards welfare and welfare claimants. They will be able to: make written and oral presentations on topics in these fields of study which are cogent, coherent, and logically structured, undertake independent research within the structure of a guided and indicative reading list.

Skills outcomes
Written skills, learning skills, IT skills, presentational skills.Written skills, learning skills, IT skills, presentational skills.


Syllabus

This module explores the social, political, economic and cultural influences that have shaped the post-war welfare state. It shows how the 'Classic Welfare State' of the 1940s rested upon assumptions about the nature of the family, of work and of nationhood that proved to be false. The welfare state was further undermined by a decline in popular deference to professional authority and, crucially, by ideological critiques of the post-war settlement. The module examines these critiques and the work of some of the thinkers upon which they drew. The so-called 'Thatcherite' and 'New Labour' welfare settlements are examined in this context, and the differences and commonalities between them are explored.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Tutorial101.0010.00
Private study hours179.00
Total Contact hours21.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Essay and exam: 100 hours;
Reading for lectures: 40 hours;
Preparation for tutorials: 40 hours.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Attendance and presentations.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay2,000 words50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated


Exams
Exam typeExam duration% of formal assessment
Standard exam (closed essays, MCQs etc)2 hr 00 mins50.00
Total percentage (Assessment Exams)50.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 18/01/2010

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