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2008/09 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

SLSP2952 Urban Disorders, Social Divisions and Social Control

20 creditsClass Size: 130

Module manager: Professor Malcolm Harrison
Email: M.L.Harrison@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 2 (Jan to Jun) View Timetable

Year running 2008/09

Pre-requisite qualifications

Normally 40 Credits taken within the Faculty of ESSL or related disciplines.

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

This module aims to help students understand some of the problems and complexities of contemporary urban life, and to learn about the responses of institutions to issues of behaviour, deviance, social and physical 'disorders', integration, equality and community. It also allows participants to look back at lessons about social control and social engineering from the past. Although overall coverage is broad, students will specialise when choosing assignments. You will be expected to engage in depth with specific topics such as anti-social behaviour, community cohesion, ethnic segregation, homelessness, urban renewal and the voluntary sector. You will explore historical or present-day instances and illustrations from a range of literatures.Contact: Dr Malcolm Harrison m.l.harrison@leeds.ac.uk or undergradsociologysocialpolicy@leeds.ac.uk

Objectives

This module offers students opportunities to strengthen their knowledge of the problems and complexities of urban life, and to learn about the responses of institutions to issues of difference, deviance, disorder, integration, segregation, equality, and community. Choosing from a range of selected case study fields, participants will engage in depth with specific issues of social order, support, intervention, planning or regulation, and will explore historical or present-day instances and illustrations from a range of literatures. The module is cross-disciplinary in intent, drawing upon insights from sociology, social policy, criminology, history, ethnic relations, and urban studies. As well as offering opportunities to encounter a range of general insights, the module provides for in-depth specialisation in written work, including options for improving skills in engaging with historical accounts, with analysis of key ideas and themes, or directly with recent governmental and voluntary sector policy developments.

Skills outcomes
Students will have opportunities to improve their verbal and written presentation skills, and to enhance their understanding of the nature and use of secondary source materials and published investigations.


Syllabus

This module provides an overview of some key features of urban life, and explores the responses of institutions to issues of difference, division, deviance, disorder, integration, segregation, equality, and community. Choosing from a range of selected topics, participants engage with specific issues of social order, support, intervention, planning or regulation, and may focus either on historical or present-day contexts.

The topics for in-depth study are drawn from the following:-

Divided cities, and the labelling, classifying and regulating of people and neighbourhoods;
Anti-social behaviour and its management;
Responding to riots and segregation, and the debate on community cohesion;
Homelessness; experiences, causes and remedies;
Equal opportunity policies, ethnicity, and processes of regulation, monitoring and research for urban institutions;
'Top-down' planning ideas of the past, and their effects on households, renewal and regeneration;
The impact of the growth of neighbourhood and service user participation and empowerment;
Changing regulatory systems; the developing roles of voluntary sector organisations.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture111.0011.00
Tutorial101.0010.00
Private study hours179.00
Total Contact hours21.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

Reading for tutorials and consultations: 19 hours;
Initial essay planning and design: 20 hours;
Surveying literature and sources: 40 hours;
Assessed essay preparation: 50 hours;
Preparation for sat examination: 50 hours.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

By presentations, feedback opportunity in lecture, and individual consultations with tutor.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay4,500 words70.00
Literature Review1,000 words with full bibliography30.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 08/03/2010

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