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2010/11 Undergraduate Module Catalogue

ENGL2022 English in Time and Space

20 creditsClass Size: 60

English

Module manager: Professor Clive Upton
Email: C.S.Upton@leeds.ac.uk

Taught: Semester 1 (Sep to Jan) View Timetable

Year running 2010/11

Pre-requisite qualifications

Students should have some elementary background in language study / linguistics. Students with an A in English Language A-Level who wish to do this module should consult the coordinator, as should any student who is uncertain whether they meet the prerequisite requirements.

Those wishing to take this module as an elective must have passed a module providing an introduction to language study in the School of English or another department (such modules include 'Language, Text & Context', 'Foundations of Language Study', 'Language Methodologies & Research Methods', a level 1 module in Linguistics & Phonetics, or similar modules in other departments in Modern Languages).

Module replaces

ENGL2021 and ENGL2020

This module is approved as an Elective

Module summary

The module examines the historical roots and implications of current linguistic controversies: shifting ideas about 'rules' and 'correctness' in spelling, punctuation and grammar; the changing nature and status of regional dialects and personal idiolects. It also reflects on the rich diversity of present-day English and on the future of English as a world language, among others. To the extent to which it is feasible, we progress from chronological to spatial aspects.

Objectives

The objective of this module is to explore aspects of the English language as it has developed over time (1500 years) and space (the world, but also other contexts, for example the virtual, literary, media spaces etc.)

Learning outcomes
We aim, first, to help students acquire a sense of the distinctive contribution to the resources of the language made by the Anglo-Saxons, the Scandinavians and the Normans. We trace and seek to explain the differences between the language of Chaucerian, Shakespearean and modern Britain. We follow the language as, through the growth of the British Empire, it diversified as a result of moving into, for example, North America, Asia and Australasia.

Skills outcomes
- Skills for effective communication, oral and written.
- Capacity to analyse and critically examine diverse forms of discourse.
- Ability to acquire quantities of complex information of diverse kinds in a structured and systematic way.
- Capacity for independent thought and judgement.
- Critical reasoning.
- Research skills, including information retrieval skills, the organisation of material, and the evaluation of its importance.
- IT skills.
- Time management and organisational skills.
- Independent learning.


Syllabus

The module examines the historical roots and implications of current linguistic controversies: shifting ideas about 'rules' and 'correctness' in spelling, punctuation and grammar; the changing nature and status of regional dialects and personal idiolects. It also reflects on the rich diversity of present-day English and on the future of English as a world language, among others.

Teaching methods

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information

Delivery typeNumberLength hoursStudent hours
Lecture221.0022.00
Seminar101.0010.00
Private study hours168.00
Total Contact hours32.00
Total hours (100hr per 10 credits)200.00

Private study

To include preparation and reading for each weekly seminar; accessing relevant materials in the VLE; preparation for the assessed essays.

Opportunities for Formative Feedback

Seminars will provide an opportunity to discuss module topics, and will assist in the planning of assignments.

Methods of assessment

Due to COVID-19, teaching and assessment activities are being kept under review - see module enrolment pages for information


Coursework
Assessment typeNotes% of formal assessment
Essay3,000 words60.00
Essay2,000 words40.00
Total percentage (Assessment Coursework)100.00

Normally resits will be assessed by the same methodology as the first attempt, unless otherwise stated

Reading list

The reading list is available from the Library website

Last updated: 14/03/2012

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